Charm (?), n. [F. charme, fr. L. carmen song, verse, incantation, for casmen, akin to Skr. ssasman, ssasa, a laudatory song, from a root signifying to praise, to sing.]

1.

A melody; a song.

[Obs.]

With charm of earliest birds. Milton.

Free liberty to chant our charms at will. Spenser.

2.

A word or combination of words sung or spoken in the practice of magic; a magical combination of words, characters, etc.; an incantation.

My high charms work. Shak.

3.

That which exerts an irresistible power to please and attract; that which fascinates; any alluring quality.

Charms strike the sight, but merit wins the soul. Pope.

The charm of beauty's powerful glance. Milton.

4.

Anything worn for its supposed efficacy to the wearer in averting ill or securing good fortune.

5.

Any small decorative object worn on the person, as a seal, a key, a silver whistle, or the like. Bunches of charms are often worn at the watch chain.

Syn. - Spell; incantation; conjuration; enchantment; fascination; attraction.

 

© Webster 1913.


Charm, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Charmed (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Charming.] [Cf. F. charmer. See Charm, n.]

1.

To make music upon; to tune.

[Obs. & R.]

Here we our slender pipes may safely charm. Spenser.

2.

To subdue, control, or summon by incantation or supernatural influence; to affect by magic.

No witchcraft charm thee! Shak.

3.

To subdue or overcome by some secret power, or by that which gives pleasure; to allay; to soothe.

Music the fiercest grief can charm. Pope.

4.

To attract irresistibly; to delight exceedingly; to enchant; to fascinate.

They, on their mirth and dance Intent, with jocund music charm his ear. Milton.

5.

To protect with, or make invulnerable by, spells, charms, or supernatural influences; as, a charmed life.

I, in my own woe charmed, Could not find death. Shak.

Syn. - To fascinate; enchant; enrapture; captivate; bewitch; allure; subdue; delight; entice; transport.

 

© Webster 1913.


Charm, v. i.

1.

To use magic arts or occult power; to make use of charms.

The voice of charmers, charming never so wisely. Ps. lviii. 5.

2.

To act as, or produce the effect of, a charm; to please greatly; to be fascinating.

3.

To make a musical sound.

[Obs.]

Milton.

 

© Webster 1913.

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