Herd (?), a.

Haired.

[Obs.]

Chaucer.

 

© Webster 1913.


Herd (?), n. [OE. herd, heord, AS. heord; akin to OHG. herta,G. herde, Icel. hjor, Sw. hjord, Dan. hiord, Goth. ha�xa1;rda; cf. Skr. ssardha troop, host.]

1.

A number of beasts assembled together; as, a herd of horses, oxen, cattle, camels, elephants, deer, or swine; a particular stock or family of cattle.

The lowing herd wind slowly o'er the lea. Gray.

Herd is distinguished from flock, as being chiefly applied to the larger animals. A number of cattle, when driven to market, is called a drove.

2.

A crowd of low people; a rabble.

But far more numerous was the herd of such Who think too little and who talk too much. Dryden.

You can never interest the common herd in the abstract question. Coleridge.

Herd's grass Bot., one of several species of grass, highly esteemed for hay. See under Grass.

 

© Webster 1913.


Herd, n. [OE. hirde, herde, heorde, AS. hirde, hyrde, heorde; akin to G. hirt, hirte, OHG. hirti, Icel. hirir, Sw. herde, Dan. hyrde, Goth. ha�xa1;rdeis. See 2d Herd.]

One who herds or assembles domestic animals; a herdsman; -- much used in composition; as, a shepherd; a goatherd, and the like.

Chaucer.

 

© Webster 1913.


Herd, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Herded; p. pr. & vb. n. Herding.] [See 2d Herd.]

1.

To unite or associate in a herd; to feed or run together, or in company; as, sheep herd on many hills.

2.

To associate; to ally one's self with, or place one's self among, a group or company.

I'll herd among his friends, and seem One of the number. Addison.

3.

To act as a herdsman or a shepherd.

[Scot.]

 

© Webster 1913.


Herd, v. t.

To form or put into a herd.

 

© Webster 1913.

Log in or registerto write something here or to contact authors.